Shon Isenhour

Recent Posts

Laser Focused Turbo Implementation: Throwing the BS flag again

Tuesday, 30 January 2018 by Shon Isenhour

We live in a world where we are constantly sold silver bullets, magic pills, and laser focused turbo implementations. When in reality it takes focus, time, knowledge, and grit to implement organizational change. If someone promises you instant implementation, throw the BS flag. (If you don't have one let us know, we have plenty.) Real change takes more than a few weeks; no matter how many...

What Is In and Out In 2018: The Maintenance and Reliability Edition

Tuesday, 09 January 2018 by Shon Isenhour

As James Kovacevic and I sat around and talked about trends in Maintenance and Reliability going into 2018 we noticed that we could see some elements that had fallen out of favor in 2017 (at least in North America) and others that have become the hot new thing. Out of that became the list you see above. Many of the decisions have been driven by the return of manufacturing demand and the need...

Maintenance and Reliability Engineers: How Are They Different, and How Many Should I Have?

Tuesday, 26 December 2017 by Shon Isenhour
So another common question that manufacturing maintenance folks ask when designing a new reliability organization is about the Maintenance Engineer (ME) and how he is different from the Reliability Engineer (RE) and how many of each they should have. We could dive into the details of the accepted responsibilities of each but I have a nine page job role comparisons that include planners, REs,...

A Balanced Improvement Strategy

Wednesday, 13 December 2017 by Shon Isenhour
Guest Post this week from Darrin Wikoff

Facts and Statistics on Growth, Skills, Reliability, and Manufacturing

Monday, 23 October 2017 by Shon Isenhour
Today's blog post includes many facts and statistics that I have collected while preparing to present at the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufactures Reliability Conference this week. This is the group formally known as NPRA and if you are going to be their look me up. These tidbits are from various recent magazine articles and studies and will help you communicate the need for both...

More Preventive is Not Necessarily the Answer

Tuesday, 26 September 2017 by Shon Isenhour

More is not necessarily better when it comes to preventive maintenance you have to find the right amount done right with the right tools.

Leadership, Fast Cars, and Road Blocks: Three things leaders need to know about project roadblock removal.

Thursday, 14 September 2017 by Shon Isenhour

Leadership is about road block removal. Your team may be the best in the world at what they do but certain issues can stop them cold every time. They may be like a garage full of incredibly fast sports cars eager to get the job done, but someone has to open the garage door to get them started and remove the roadblocks along the way that prevent them from demonstrating their full potential. In...

So is it a Planner, a Scheduler, or is it a Planner/Scheduler?

Monday, 11 September 2017 by Shon Isenhour

Recently, I had an interesting conversation about staffing the maintenance planner and scheduler roles with in a facility. The question was centered on whether a site should have the two disciplines split or if they should be combined. The answer in my mind is… it depends.

Here are my thoughts on criteria that affect the planner/scheduler organizational structure:

Size of the maintenance...

Five Why "Nots": 5 Reasons Why Reliability Engineers Should Use More Than 5 Whys for Root Cause Analysis

Tuesday, 05 September 2017 by Shon Isenhour

First of all let's talk about what Five Whys is before we mention what it is not. It is a problem solving tool used in many facilities and is commonly associated with Lean, Six Sigma and Kaizen implementations. The technique was originally developed by Sakichi Toyoda and was used within the Toyota Motor Corporation during the evolution of its manufacturing methodologies. The method is quite...

Transitional Root Cause Analysis

Monday, 28 August 2017 by Shon Isenhour

When I discuss RCA I use a method called Transitional Root Cause Analysis or TRCA for short.

It is made up of 10 tools that can be explained and understood in a very short period of time.

In the next few minutes I will demonstrate both the simplicity and rules for use for 3 of the 10 and explain why we consider them transitional in nature.

In this blog we will use what I categorize as the tree...

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